Hughie O’Donoghue : One Hundred Years and Four Quarters at the Galway International Arts Festival

Galway International Arts Festival

An exhibition of new paintings and painted constructions consisting of 20 works now in progress by Hughie O’Donoghue.

The artist notes:

“For many years the dominant theme in my work has been memory and how, through the interrogation of memory, ideas about ‘identity’ and sometimes ‘truth’ are arrived at. I believe that history is personal and can only really be understood through the individual rather than the universal. In these new works, as in other bodies of work, I have drawn on my own experience and connections, people that I knew or knew of.”

The structure and content of this group of works has been dictated by four distinct pathways, four quarters, like the four differing accounts of a murder in Kurosawa’s 1951 film ‘Rashomon’. In the film ‘The Murder of a Samurai’ is recounted by four characters, a bandit, the Samurai’s wife, his own ghost and a woodcutter; their stories are mutually contradictory and self serving.

A hundred years on from the events of 1916 the four characters evoked in these new paintings are the revolutionary, the soldier, the sailor and the peasant, through them four episodes from 1916, The Easter Rising, The Somme, The Battle of Jutland and the life of a subsistence farmer in the west of Ireland are examined in an attempt to explore the subjective and fugitive nature of truth.

 

 

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Galway International Arts Festival

An exhibition of new paintings and painted constructions consisting of 20 works now in progress by Hughie O’Donoghue.

The artist notes:

“For many years the dominant theme in my work has been memory and how, through the interrogation of memory, ideas about ‘identity’ and sometimes ‘truth’ are arrived at. I believe that history is personal and can only really be understood through the individual rather than the universal. In these new works, as in other bodies of work, I have drawn on my own experience and connections, people that I knew or knew of.”

The structure and content of this group of works has been dictated by four distinct pathways, four quarters, like the four differing accounts of a murder in Kurosawa’s 1951 film ‘Rashomon’. In the film ‘The Murder of a Samurai’ is recounted by four characters, a bandit, the Samurai’s wife, his own ghost and a woodcutter; their stories are mutually contradictory and self serving.

A hundred years on from the events of 1916 the four characters evoked in these new paintings are the revolutionary, the soldier, the sailor and the peasant, through them four episodes from 1916, The Easter Rising, The Somme, The Battle of Jutland and the life of a subsistence farmer in the west of Ireland are examined in an attempt to explore the subjective and fugitive nature of truth.

 

< Back to News