Stacey Davidson: Works on paper

13 January 2010 - 5 February 2010

“I am a painter who makes dolls. And whether I am sculpting a head or painting, my concern throughout are character and the human heart.

At first, I made dolls to hang in front of portraits. They opened the paintings to unseen territory: psychic pressures and histories we all carry. They acted as foil and relief to the portraits. Their bodies didn’t have to be proportion. They could scream, be hideous, and do all the things that a seated portrait could not.

The work in this book came about doll by doll. As I’ve made the dolls, I’ve tried them out in different contexts. I’ve screwed their feet to the walls, where they perch sometimes on the edges of paintings or reflective panels. I’ve placed them outside for a month in the dead winter. I’ve made them a stage and written them a play. They’ve been photographed, filmed, and painted.

People ask, “Where do you get these dolls” which delights me, as it confirms the dolls’ otherness- that they look begotten, not made.

Through all this making, I have learned that they are actors. And with my cast now assembled, I’ve put them to work, posing for paintings.”

 

< Back to Exhibitions

 

“I am a painter who makes dolls. And whether I am sculpting a head or painting, my concern throughout are character and the human heart.

At first, I made dolls to hang in front of portraits. They opened the paintings to unseen territory: psychic pressures and histories we all carry. They acted as foil and relief to the portraits. Their bodies didn’t have to be proportion. They could scream, be hideous, and do all the things that a seated portrait could not.

The work in this book came about doll by doll. As I’ve made the dolls, I’ve tried them out in different contexts. I’ve screwed their feet to the walls, where they perch sometimes on the edges of paintings or reflective panels. I’ve placed them outside for a month in the dead winter. I’ve made them a stage and written them a play. They’ve been photographed, filmed, and painted.

People ask, “Where do you get these dolls” which delights me, as it confirms the dolls’ otherness- that they look begotten, not made.

Through all this making, I have learned that they are actors. And with my cast now assembled, I’ve put them to work, posing for paintings.”

< Back to Exhibitions