Narelle Jubelin: Flamenco Primitivo

4 February 2016 - 12 March 2016

Press Release

Exhibition Catalogue

Artist Info

Marlborough Contemporary is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by artist Narelle Jubelin, marking her second solo show with the gallery.

Born in Sydney in 1960, Jubelin has lived and worked in Madrid since 1996. Her work engages with the translation of visual culture across countries, with particular reference to the legacies of international Modernists.

Flamenco Primitivo appropriates its title from the opening ‘cante’ (actually unsung) performed in Madrid by the contemporary Flamenco singer Niño de Elche, breaking tradition whilst wearing a Francis Bacon t-shirt. Exploring the way objects – particularly those of cultural significance – travel through the world, Jubelin uses artistic movements as a vehicle through which to navigate such flows. The physical context of Jubelin’s work is central to the exhibition; Marlborough, and the gallery’s own relationship with seminal artists such as Bacon, almost instinctually become part of the artist’s narrative.

 

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Press Release

Exhibition Catalogue

Artist Info

 

Marlborough Contemporary is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by artist Narelle Jubelin, marking her second solo show with the gallery.

Born in Sydney in 1960, Jubelin has lived and worked in Madrid since 1996. Her work engages with the translation of visual culture across countries, with particular reference to the legacies of international Modernists.

Flamenco Primitivo appropriates its title from the opening ‘cante’ (actually unsung) performed in Madrid by the contemporary Flamenco singer Niño de Elche, breaking tradition whilst wearing a Francis Bacon t-shirt. Exploring the way objects – particularly those of cultural significance – travel through the world, Jubelin uses artistic movements as a vehicle through which to navigate such flows. The physical context of Jubelin’s work is central to the exhibition; Marlborough, and the gallery’s own relationship with seminal artists such as Bacon, almost instinctually become part of the artist’s narrative.

< Back to Exhibitions