Two Decades: British Printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s

29 November 2017 - 6 January 2018

Press Release

Artworks

Marlborough Fine Art is pleased to present Two Decades – British Printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s featuring work by Barbara Hepworth, Allen Jones, R.B. Kitaj, Henry Moore, Victor Pasmore, John Piper, Graham Sutherland and Joe Tilson.

In the 1950’s printmaking in the UK experienced a revival, and over three decades British artists across two generations sought to expand their practice by working in print. Developments in etching, lithography and screenprint flourished with the development of dedicated print studios such as Curwen Press, one of the first where artists had freedom to really explore printmaking.

At the start of the 1960’s critics began to devote articles to the ‘rebirth’ of the artist’s print and to the annual print exhibition Graven Image held at Whitechapel Gallery. The boom allowed a wider audience to acquire the work of contemporary artists. Marlborough Fine Art entered the print publishing market in the early 1960s.

In the mid-1970s Tate Britain founded the contemporary print archive and works by all eight artists were donated to form the basis of the collection. Subsequent exhibitions at Tate ensured artists printed images achieved a new status and public appreciation in the UK.

Printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s was a critical development in each of these artists oeuvre; by allowing for experimentation and innovation it became a vital part of their practice.

View Artworks

 

 

 

 

< Back to Exhibitions

Press Release

Artworks

 

Marlborough Fine Art is pleased to present Two Decades – British Printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s featuring work by Barbara Hepworth, Allen Jones, R.B. Kitaj, Henry Moore, Victor Pasmore, John Piper, Graham Sutherland and Joe Tilson.

In the 1950’s printmaking in the UK experienced a revival, and over three decades British artists across two generations sought to expand their practice by working in print. Developments in etching, lithography and screenprint flourished with the development of dedicated print studios such as Curwen Press, one of the first where artists had freedom to really explore printmaking.

At the start of the 1960’s critics began to devote articles to the ‘rebirth’ of the artist’s print and to the annual print exhibition Graven Image held at Whitechapel Gallery. The boom allowed a wider audience to acquire the work of contemporary artists. Marlborough Fine Art entered the print publishing market in the early 1960s.

In the mid-1970s Tate Britain founded the contemporary print archive and works by all eight artists were donated to form the basis of the collection. Subsequent exhibitions at Tate ensured artists printed images achieved a new status and public appreciation in the UK.

Printmaking in the 1960s and 1970s was a critical development in each of these artists oeuvre; by allowing for experimentation and innovation it became a vital part of their practice.

View Artworks

 

 

 

< Back to Exhibitions