Bill Jacklin: Monotypes

6 May 2016 - 4 June 2016

Press Release

Exhibition Catalogue

Widewalls Article

Marlborough Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by Bill Jacklin, an artist who has shown with the gallery for over 35 years.

The exhibition coincides with Jacklin’s solo show of graphic works at the Royal Academy (3 June – 28 August 2016) and the publication of two new books: Bill Jacklin: Graphics (RA Publications, 2016) with writing by Jill Lloyd and Nancy Campbell and Bill Jacklin’s New York (Scala, 2016) featuring an introduction by Sting and interview with Michael Peppiatt.

Jacklin came to prominence in the 1960s in London as an abstract artist producing works made of grids and dots.  Despite his success, Jacklin felt impelled to return to figuration, finding himself ostracised as ‘a traitor to the cause of abstraction.’ In 1985, Jacklin moved to Manhattan and found his muse in the subject of the city. Ever since, he has painted numerous scenes of New York including the pulsating energy of crowds in Times Square and Grand Central Station and figures diving into the waves in Coney Island. The works in the exhibition demonstrate Jacklin’s continued exploration into people and places.

 

< Back to Exhibitions

Press Release

Exhibition Catalogue

Widewalls Article

 

Marlborough Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by Bill Jacklin, an artist who has shown with the gallery for over 35 years.

The exhibition coincides with Jacklin’s solo show of graphic works at the Royal Academy (3 June – 28 August 2016) and the publication of two new books: Bill Jacklin: Graphics (RA Publications, 2016) with writing by Jill Lloyd and Nancy Campbell and Bill Jacklin’s New York (Scala, 2016) featuring an introduction by Sting and interview with Michael Peppiatt.

Jacklin came to prominence in the 1960s in London as an abstract artist producing works made of grids and dots.  Despite his success, Jacklin felt impelled to return to figuration, finding himself ostracised as ‘a traitor to the cause of abstraction.’ In 1985, Jacklin moved to Manhattan and found his muse in the subject of the city. Ever since, he has painted numerous scenes of New York including the pulsating energy of crowds in Times Square and Grand Central Station and figures diving into the waves in Coney Island. The works in the exhibition demonstrate Jacklin’s continued exploration into people and places.

< Back to Exhibitions