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Born in Bradford in 1951. Studied at the Bradford School of Art (1968-71) and at Goldsmiths College (1971-74) and the Slade School of Fine Art (1974-76). His early work centred around half- and three-quarter length portraits of punk-like figures, painted in a deliberately crude, virtually punk style of loosely outlined features and with a restricted palette of only two or three colours on the canvas. The portrait settings extended to no more than a chair, table or filing cabinet.   His painting gradually came to concentrate on the head – increasingly his own – seen from unusual, disorientating angles, and in schematic, almost scarified representations. These portraits had been likened to works by Bacon, Freud and Auerbach, but in reality they belong to the concerns of a younger, angrier generation, and drew inspiration from the distortions of the 18th century quasi –expressionist German sculptor, Franz Xaver Messerschmidt.

In 2006 Bevan went to Venice to work at the Scuola di Grafica as part of the Artist International Print Project, where he produced more than 80 monotype images, in a technique which he had not tried before. Taking his cue from his signature skeletal and monochrome outlining of furniture, his subjects broadened to include hollow, uninhabited halls and ceiling rafters, which could be read as much as about place as abstract, even threatening configurations, especially as colour had been drained almost uniformly into black. Recent exhibitions have included the Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal (2003), IVAM – Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2005), Centre d’Art Contemporain, Perpignan (2007), the De la Warr Pavilion, Bexhill (2010) and his self-portraits at the National Portrait Gallery, London (2011).

 

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Biography

Exhibitions

View available works

Born in Bradford in 1951. Studied at the Bradford School of Art (1968-71) and at Goldsmiths College (1971-74) and the Slade School of Fine Art (1974-76). His early work centred around half- and three-quarter length portraits of punk-like figures, painted in a deliberately crude, virtually punk style of loosely outlined features and with a restricted palette of only two or three colours on the canvas. The portrait settings extended to no more than a chair, table or filing cabinet.   His painting gradually came to concentrate on the head – increasingly his own – seen from unusual, disorientating angles, and in schematic, almost scarified representations. These portraits had been likened to works by Bacon, Freud and Auerbach, but in reality they belong to the concerns of a younger, angrier generation, and drew inspiration from the distortions of the 18th century quasi –expressionist German sculptor, Franz Xaver Messerschmidt.

In 2006 Bevan went to Venice to work at the Scuola di Grafica as part of the Artist International Print Project, where he produced more than 80 monotype images, in a technique which he had not tried before. Taking his cue from his signature skeletal and monochrome outlining of furniture, his subjects broadened to include hollow, uninhabited halls and ceiling rafters, which could be read as much as about place as abstract, even threatening configurations, especially as colour had been drained almost uniformly into black. Recent exhibitions have included the Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal (2003), IVAM – Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2005), Centre d’Art Contemporain, Perpignan (2007), the De la Warr Pavilion, Bexhill (2010) and his self-portraits at the National Portrait Gallery, London (2011).

 

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